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13 Dec 2006 13:31 - zorro
Windpower installation March 07

 

 

 

Air

Tuesday 13th March '07

This is a page for those interested in installing [ ... ]

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18 Nov 2008 18:09 - snipe

Windpower Update November 08

 

So its now November and our turbine has survived some heavy winds [ ... ]

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06 Nov 2009 17:08 - zorro
Windpower november 09

So the turbine has been working well now for over a year and a half, Fitting the smaller blades has really [ ... ]

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04 Dec 2009 12:24 - jimnoctor
Pv solar power

NOVEMBER 09

We have been living and working off grid for three years now, with electricity solely from [ ... ]

Power from the SunRead more...
10 Mar 2011 11:10 - judy
Diary of a week 2007... 4 years later

10th March 2011

 

Four years have flown by, we have become one with the earth and energy here. [ ... ]

Off grid livingRead more...
01 Mar 2012 19:07 - jimnoctor
Rebuilding Charlie

Rebuilding Charlie

Charlie has been providing our power here for the past 5 years , has weathered many [ ... ]

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The trip goes smoothly at a steady 25 MPH well we are in no rush and a few hours later we arrive at the Castle.where we are greeted by the hostess, the woman in red with the horns . Nothing new so far eh..

devil

 

We a are shown to the deepest  cellar where some of the other Children await.

 

Uisneach.

Is situated in mid Ireland, the fifth provenceA very magical place indeed in County Westmeath located near the village of Ballymore.<;/strong>

 

In Irish mythology it was considered to be the omphalos (mystical navel) of Ireland, whereupon rested a great stone (Ail na Míreann, which means “stone of divisions”) which was said to indicate the provincial borders of Connacht, Leinster, Ulster and Munster. Tradition tells that Uisneach was a site favoured for Beltane fires and Druidical ceremonies

 

Uisneach (pronounced ooshnick) was the site where the Festival of Bealtaine (pronounced Bee-all-tana, meaning May), was inaugurated on the first of May.

This is where the Summer fires were kindled. This celebration site was particularly important not only because it marked the end of Winter and the beginning of Summer, but because it was a celebration of life. Winters were very rough and many died. Those who survived winter’s grip celebrated the powers of growth and light because the powers of darkness and death had successfully been defeated. Tradition records how two fires were lit on the hill and cattle were driven through the flames to ward off evil influences for the coming year and ensure prosperity.

partypics-006Uisneach is also known as the fifth province. Ireland was broken into 4 provinces, the names of which are still used today; to the North is Ulster, East is Leinster, South is Munster and West is Connaught. Uisneach was considered to be the center of Ireland where the other 4 provinces meet. A large stone known as the “catstone” is said to mark the exact spot. Nothing much remains of this site other than several earth works on the hill, which includes burial monuments and a fort.

There is a myth about this site that says that this is the place where the very first fires were lit

I think this lad on the right probably lit the fire!!

 

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Looks like the wine is starting to flow,

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Its all in the eyes, a very beautiful cat person

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Yes there was the odd virgin around ,some of them very odd.In the Mediterranean region, there was a pre-Christian spring celebration centered around the vernal equinox (March 20 or 21) that honored Cybele, the Phrygian goddess of fertility. Cybele’s consort, Attis, was considered born of a virgin and was believed to have died and been resurrected three days late

There are many musical types around also

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Here the big Pixie is giving a few box lessons as the brain surgeon watches with interest

 

 

 

 

 

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Easter celebrations were held hundreds of years before Christ was born as festivals of spring honoring Eostre, the great mother goddess of the Saxons. This name was fashioned after the ancient word for spring, Eastre. The goddess Ostara was the Norse equivalent whose symbols were the hare and the egg. From this comes our modern tradition of celebrating Easter with eggs and bunnies.

 

 


partypics-029partypics-044There are other Easter traditions that are pagan in origin. The Easter sunrise service is derived from the ancient pagan practice of welcoming the sun on the morning of the spring equinox, marking the beginning of spring. What we now call Easter lilies were revered by the ancients as symbols of fertility and representative of the male genitalia. The ancient Babylonian religions had rituals involving dyed eggs as did the ancient Egyptian

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For us this magical life is all about people, and love for all nature. Music is a big part for us ,but its the magick spell of the tunes that creates the atmosphere for all to enjoy, not the technical hocus pocus.

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So there you have it ,just time for me to show the finer points of melodeon playing, and Morrigon to work some magic on the guests left standing  Its 4.30 am the party is just starting there are Pipes flutes fiddles  and bodhrans ,its a good friday night , what better way to spend it.Now back to the Tigin for some wine.....

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And a few prayers!!.

The Christian version of Easter is celebrated after the first full moon after the vernal equinox. Modern day neo-pagans usually have their spring celebrations on the day of the equinox. Either way, these celebrations have gone on every year continuously for over 2500 years. So, next  Easter, if you go to an Easter sunrise service, hunt for colored eggs or eat marshmallow bunnies, remember you are indulging in pagan rituals that celebrate fertility and the advent of springtime!

love .....celticones Springtime 2010 clip8_6

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